Full Name
J.J. Childress
Job Title
Leader of Microsoft’s TechSpark Initiative in El Paso, an economic development and civic engagement program aimed at helping communities develop the talent for the opportunities of the 21st Century
Speaker Bio
J.J. Childress is a born and raised El Pasoan and a serial entrepreneur who has founded several separate and diverse businesses from a custom apparel shop to an independent registered investment advisory firm. He was recognized as the Small Business Administration’s Young Entrepreneur in 2017.
He currently leads Microsoft’s TechSpark Initiative in El Paso, an economic development and civic engagement program aimed at helping communities develop the talent for the opportunities of the 21st Century. He values civic engagement and is involved with several non-profits and advisory boards in El Paso.
JJ is a proud graduate from the University of Texas at El Paso with a BBA in Finance and Accounting, as well as an MBA. He is also a graduate of Stanford University’s Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative program through the Graduate School of Business, and the University of Washington’s Accelerating Social Transformation program through the Bothell School of Business and Evans School of Public Policy & Governance.
About TechSpark
TechSpark is a civic program designed to foster greater economic opportunity and job creation in rural and smaller metropolitan communities. By partnering closely at the local level, we learn about unique regional challenges and explore ways to spark local economic growth. We will share our learnings broadly so other communities can adopt what works. Our efforts are rooted in local partnerships and focus on three key areas: Promoting digital skills and employability, Increasing access to broadband, Helping local organizations thrive through technology.
About TEALS
Technology Education and Literacy in Schools (TEALS) is a Microsoft Philanthropies program that builds sustainable CS programs in high schools. We focus on serving students excluded from learning CS because of race, gender, and geography. TEALS helps teachers learn to teach CS by pairing them with industry volunteers and proven curricula.
The TEALS program serves 10,000 students at 455 high schools in the United States and British Columbia, Canada.
TEALS is powered by over 1,500 technical volunteers from 650 companies.
35% of students identify as female, 34% are underrepresented minorities, and nearly 1 in 5 schools are in rural communities.
TEALS students scored 8% higher than the national average on the 2018 AP Computer Science A exam.
J.J. Childress